You are here: Home \ Challenges \ Extreme Poverty \ Elements of the problem situation

Problem tree

Related problems

None added

Search

Type-ahead search field here...
Advanced faceted search...

Index

List all concepts alphabetically here (everything from issues, facts, data sets, solutions, actions, criterias etc). Use faceted search to filter, sort and group items.

Map

Interactive map mindmap like diagram here where users can browse the entire problem space using relations such as those between object, stakeholders, variables ... and anything else.

Elements of the problem situation

Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

Find people, groups and institutions that have something to gain or lose.

List people/groups that play a significant role in areas such as technological innovation, policymaking, research, or exchange or utilization of new or existing knowledge etc.

The lists below are places where you may look to find stakeholders.

Sector, area or profession of possible stakeholders
  • Corporations and businesses
  • Business associations
  • Professional bodies
  • Individual business leaders
  • Financial institutions
  • Ministers and advisors
  • Civil servants and departments
  • Elected representatives or officials
  • Courts
  • Political parties
  • Governing bodies, local government, councils
  • Military
  • Commissions
  • International bodies
  • Media
  • Churches
  • Schools and Universities
  • Social movements, NGOs and advocacy groups
  • Trade unions
  • Citizens, tax payers
  • Minority groups, women, the poor
Roles of possible stakeholders
  • Worker
  • Competitor
  • Supplier, partner, dealer, resource controller
  • Manager
  • Employer
  • Popular or influential person
  • Shareholder
  • Regulatory agency
  • Advisor or expert
  • Activist
  • Political faction
  • Operator, handler, controller
  • Expert, designer, support provider
  • Service recipients
  • Funding organization
  • The young (Future generations)
Stakeholder analysis tasks
  • To make sure you have found all the relevant stakeholders go back to the list of issues and see who is involved in the issue in one way or another.
  • When talking to stakeholders, ask them who else to talk to.
  • Are you or someone else on Koios a stakeholder?
  • Should stakeholders be invited to join Koios?
  • Who else could make an important contribution to the problem situation? Should this person be a stakeholder?
  • Have you assembled a diverse set of stakeholders? Are all sides represented? Who has participated in the past?
  • Should the general public be represented as a stakeholder?
Interviewing stakeholders

Interviewing individuals who have credibility in and knowledge of the system in the eyes of the other stakeholders in the system can be extremely valuable.

Consider developing a consent form for stakeholders to give their written consent to use the information that they provided. For more informal interviews you should at least ask if their comments can be added on Koios.

Starting a dialog

At this point you should strongly consider entering into an authentic two-way lasting conversation with the stakeholders. An authentic dialog is important to create human relations that will improve motivation for working together and it will allow you to get to know the stakeholder and his or hers mental model (how they see the world). Just keep in mind to not exhaust stakeholders.

Stakeholder engagement must be coordinated and if you decide to engage a stakeholder you should be pretty sure that you have the means to follow through. You must avoid a situation where new problem solvers arrive and engage the stakeholder to ask the same questions over and over, only to vanish because the problem solver no longer wants to participate in the project.

Watch out for

  • Beware not to over generalize. You may want to split a group into factions.

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

This section helps you perform a Stakeholder analysis which is the process of identifying the individuals or groups that are likely to affect the problem, be affected by the problem or be in a position to propose solutions to the problem.

This information is used to understand the problem and to assess how the interests of those stakeholders should be addressed when solving the problem.

A stakeholder (sometimes called an actor or player in professional jargon) may be a single person, a group, an institution or any structure or mechanism of social order and cooperation governing the behavior of a set of individuals within a given community.

Open the table view to be able to sort stakeholders in different dimensions such as according to their potential impact.

Suggested reading

What persons, groups and institutions are involved?

close

Add new stakeholder

Before adding the stakeholder ask yourself if the stakeholder has direct or indirect influence on our indicators. If the stakeholder does not, then it might not be relevant enough to add.

  • To anonymize persons enter an alias name.
  • Only add persons/organizations that seem to be relevant for the problem.
  • Only add actual real world persons/entities/agents. Do not add imaginative persons, deities etc.
  • Be concise. If you want to add more content there are also other places later in the process.
  • Note that the stakeholder may read what you write.
  • Only fill in fields that are relevant and provides value. Do not add texts such as "I don't know" or "Not applicable" or "Need to find out".
Places to look for stakeholders:
  • Existing religious institutions such as churches, cults and congregations.
  • Educational institutions such as schools and universities.
  • Research centers. Technology clusters.
  • Government and public sector.
  • Hospitals and health care institutions.
  • Legal institutions such as courts, justice, prisons, regulators.
  • Military or paramilitary institutions including the police.
  • Mass media including information bureaus, TV channels, newspapers.
  • Industrial institutions such as businesses, corporations, financial institutions, banks.
  • Civil groups such as NGOs, charitable organizations, advocacy groups, political parties, think tanks and virtual communities.
  • Others including brokers, consultants, legal organizations, intermediaries.

General information



























Specific information related to problem situation



































Is the stakeholder benefiting in the situation?






Is the stakeholder loosing or suffering from the situation?






Awareness of the problem






Willingness to participate in talks about solving the problem






Power to make decisions






Power to gather people and form opinions






Level of outrage or concern by the stakeholder towards the situation






Stakeholder's knowledge






help

Add reference


Author(s)
Title
Publisher/journal
Date/year
Url address
Page number
For online sources that does not have page numbers. Use a paragraph number, or cite the heading and the number of paragraphs following it.

Add comment


Add Task


(Anyone can take it)
Show version log

Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

What are the resources that are central to the problem?

  • Natural and built resources.
  • Human or inanimate.

What resources are lacking?

Examples may include fuel, real estate, crops, farm land, water, animals, minerals, plants, money, light, work space, work force, oil, buildings, data, information, knowledge, wisdom.

Watch out for

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

This section contains information about the resources that are core to the issues of the problem.

This sub section is part of the step 'Elements' of the Koios problem solving process. This division of different elements is added to help you identify important elements of the problem.

Suggested reading

No items added. Suggest a book, or online resource?

What resources, assets and infrastructure is involved?

No resource or infrastructure element added. Add content and receive points.

close

Add new resource

Resources are anything that we use to get something done or produced.

Before adding the item ask your self if the item has direct or indirect influence on our key indicators. If the item does not, then it might not be relevant enough to add.

  • Infrastructure
  • Roads and bridges
  • Buildings
  • Natural resources (Land and water)
  • Raw material
  • Objects not considered technology.
  • Knowledge
  • Information
  • Assets

General information









Specific information related to problem situation





help

Add reference


Author(s)
Title
Publisher/journal
Date/year
Url address
Page number
For online sources that does not have page numbers. Use a paragraph number, or cite the heading and the number of paragraphs following it.

Add comment


Add Task


(Anyone can take it)
Show version log

Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

  • What are the politics, laws and rules?
  • Which current laws or policies address the problem?
  • What policies, practices, strategies, and tactics are currently in effect?
  • What laws and governmental regulations affect the situation and how?
  • What policies are causing problems or act as inhibitors?
  • What policies lead to unfairness?

Watch out for

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

This section contains information about the policies that are central to the issues of the problem.

This sub section is part of the step 'Elements' of the Koios problem solving process. This division of different elements is added to help you identify important elements of the problem.

Suggested reading

No items added. Suggest a book, or online resource?

What policies, norms and laws are involved?

No policies added. Add content and receive points.

close

Add new policy

Policies are typically principles that guide decisions and behavior.

Before adding the item, ask yourself if the item has direct or indirect influence on our key indicators. If the item does not, then it might not be relevant enough to add.

Examples include:

  • Policies
  • Rules
  • Laws
  • Regulations
  • Instructions
  • Subsidies
  • Religion
  • Established practices
  • Traditions
  • Ways of conduct
  • Customs
  • Habits
  • Education
  • Programs
  • Grants
  • Routines
  • Norms
  • Expectations

General information









Specific information related to problem situation





help

Add reference


Author(s)
Title
Publisher/journal
Date/year
Url address
Page number
For online sources that does not have page numbers. Use a paragraph number, or cite the heading and the number of paragraphs following it.

Add comment


Add Task


(Anyone can take it)
Show version log

Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

  • What are the technologies involved that are central to the problem at hand? And why is that?
  • What technologies are lacking?
  • Example areas to look for technology may be: farming, leisure, production, defense, health, communication, construction, transportation.

Watch out for

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

This section contains information about the technologies that are central to the issues of the problem.

What is technology?
Technology is the making, modification, usage, and knowledge of tools, machines, techniques, crafts, systems, methods of organization, in order to solve a problem, improve a preexisting solution to a problem, achieve a goal or perform a specific function.

This sub section is part of the step 'Elements' of the Koios problem solving process. This division of different elements is added to help you identify important elements of the problem.

Suggested reading

No items added. Suggest a book, or online resource?

What technologies are involved?

No technology added. Add content and receive points.

close

Add new technology

Before adding the item, ask yourself if the item has direct or indirect influence on our key indicators. If the item does not, then it might not be relevant enough to add.

  • Assistive technology
  • Banking technology‎
  • Construction technology
  • Cyber tech
  • Digital technology‎
  • Drilling technology
  • Electronics
  • Environmental technology‎
  • Explosives
  • Film and video technology‎
  • Food technology
  • Geographical technology
  • Information technology
  • Instructional technology
  • Instruments
  • Law enforcement techniques‎
  • Machinery
  • Media technology
  • Medical technology
  • Microtechnology
  • Missile technology
  • Music technology‎
  • Nanotechnology
  • Open-source technology
  • Radio technology‎
  • Space technology‎
  • Television technology
  • Transport
  • Vehicle technology
  • Waste treatment technology
  • Military technology‎
  • Mining techniques‎

General information









Specific information related to problem situation





help

Add reference


Author(s)
Title
Publisher/journal
Date/year
Url address
Page number
For online sources that does not have page numbers. Use a paragraph number, or cite the heading and the number of paragraphs following it.

Add comment


Add Task


(Anyone can take it)
Show version log

Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

Look for things within the problem/system that takes something through a set of prescribed procedures and transforms things to something else.

  • What are some transformations taking place?
  • What are the tasks of the relevant processes?
  • What are the services that are being carried out?
  • What processes is not working or causing problems?

Watch out for

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

This section contains information about the processes that are central to the issues of the problem.

What is a process?
A process is a series of actions or steps taken in order to achieve a particular end.

This sub section is part of the step 'Elements' of the Koios problem solving process. This division of different elements is added to help you identify important elements of the problem.

Suggested reading

No items added. Suggest a book, or online resource?

What processes are involved?

No process added. Add content and receive points.

close

Add new process

Before adding the item, ask yourself if the item has direct or indirect influence on our key indicators. If the item does not, then it might not be relevant enough to add.

Examples include:

  • Architecting
  • Biological process
  • Business process
  • Chemical process
  • Computer data processing
  • Engineering process
  • Food processing
  • Legal process
  • Industrial process
  • Information processing
  • Manufacturing process
  • Mental and cognitive processes
  • Modeling
  • Ontological and conceptual processing
  • Patent process
  • Problem solving process
  • Scientific process
  • Signal processing
  • Thermodynamic process
  • General information









    Specific information related to problem situation





    help

    Add reference


    Author(s)
    Title
    Publisher/journal
    Date/year
    Url address
    Page number
    For online sources that does not have page numbers. Use a paragraph number, or cite the heading and the number of paragraphs following it.

    Add comment


    Add Task


    (Anyone can take it)
    Show version log

    Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

    Find the relations between People, Resources, Policies, Technology and Processes.

    You may also create relations between the same types of elements. For example, relations between stakeholders could be:

    • Supporter
    • Competitor
    • Customer
    • Hostile
    • Partner
    • Vendor

    Watch out for

    Advanced topics

    Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

    This sub section lets you create relations between the elements of the problem.

    This helps us to analyse which elements/stakeholders interact within the system to create the problem. It can also be used to discover new opportunities for collaboration etc.

    Suggested reading

    No items added. Suggest a book, or online resource?

    What are the relations between the different elements within the system?

    No element relations added. Add content and receive points.

    close

    Add new element relation

    Add and describe the relation between two elements of the problem situation.

    • What is the nature of the relation?
    • Is the relation too strong or too weak?
    • Is the relation causing other parts of the system to malfunction?
    • Is the utilization of the element inadequate?
    • For stakeholder relations:
      • Describe the two way relation. E.g. What stakeholder A is to deliver to stakeholder B and what stakeholder B expects to get in return from stakeholder A.
      • Is there conflict, collaboration?






    help

    Add reference


    Author(s)
    Title
    Publisher/journal
    Date/year
    Url address
    Page number
    For online sources that does not have page numbers. Use a paragraph number, or cite the heading and the number of paragraphs following it.

    Add comment


    Add Task


    (Anyone can take it)
    Show version log
    Issue type



    Severity




    Issue title


    Description
    Development issues