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Problem definition

Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

Add a short description of the problem. Try to include the following:

  • What the problem is?
  • Where does it occur?
  • When does it happen and how often?
  • Who experiences it?
  • Why the problem matter?
  • What is it too much or too little of (or about to be)?

The problem statement will be very unclear in the start so revisit this sub section regularly. Re-examine the problem statement by asking:

  • What is the problem?
  • Is it stated objectively using only facts?
  • Is it framed properly?
  • Will all who read it understand it in the same way?
  • Can we restate the problem in a more useful way?

Watch out for

  • Beware not to be too broad or narrow.
  • Don't make assumptions.
  • Do not include solutions in the statement.
  • Do not include cause and effects.

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

This sub section is to provide a concise summary description of the problem that can used in communicating with others outside your problem solving team.

The problem statement is usually a one sentence claim that outlines the problem that this challenge addresses.

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What is a good and concise problem statement for the problem?

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In this case, Singapore government expects to maintain its lowest unemployment rate performance in 2015. However in the reality, the unemployment rate in Singapore start to rebound after 12 months. Therefore, Singapore government unlikely able to maintain its track record to maintain its lowest unemployment rate performance in 2015. 

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Add new problem statement

Write a paragraph describing the problem. Write as if the reader is not familiar with the problem.

Try to include as much as you can about the context, the current situation (phenomenon), critical elements and unique features in the description using just one paragraph.

  • May be formulated as a short story with some history.
  • Don't be too vague. It will keep you from identifying the problem.
  • Don't be too narrow since it may be too early to decide what to focus on.
  • Don't provide solutions.
  • Do not state the underlying cause at this point.
  • Write the text by focusing on the situation.

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Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

  • Identify the negative aspects associated with the problem.
  • Ask different stakeholders what negative effects they see.
  • Include all possible negative effects by viewing the problem from different perspectives. (e.g. sectors, disciplines, domains etc)
  • View the problem from the angle of an artist, poor person, capitalist, woman, old person, psychologist, scientist, owner, religious person and all other roles you can up with.
  • What is not working as it should?
  • What's the imbalance? Look at different levels. Is there imbalance on the level of the self, person to person relation, in teams, in an organization, among constituents or at the level of eco-systems.

While you add these negative consequences make sure to check the underlying assumptions that you hold about the nature of those issues. The most effective and efficient way to surface these assumptions is to ask questions of yourself, key decision-makers, and other important stakeholders through structured interviews.

Watch out for

At this stage you do not need to analyse and establish cause and effect. Such analysis is reserved for later stages. The negative effects can be seen as hypotheses for us to prove later in the Koios problem solving process.

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

The list of negative effects is a summary of the bad things that make this problem a problem.

What are the negative aspects of the situation that speaks for change?

Before one starts to solve a problem one needs to make sure it is actually a problem. The list of negative effects can be seen as reasons for why we should try to solve the problem. If there are no real significant negative aspects of this "problem" then it is not a really a problem.

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What is so bad about the situation?

  • Preview Causes of Unemployment · Preview
    People can be unemployed for many reasons: They quit their position and are looking for a new one. They were laid off due to lack of work and haven't yet been rehired. Their company reduced the wo...
    References (0) · Comments (0) · Report · Changes · Task · Added by Thang Lim 14.Sep.2015
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  • Preview Increasing of the foreign workforce numbers in Singapore from year 2009 until year 2014 and it causes the unemployment rate increasing · Preview
    the amount of the total foreign workforce in Singapore at the ended of the December 2009 was 1,053,500. At the ended of the December 2010 the amount of the foreign workforce increase to 1,113,200. ...
    References (0) · Comments (0) · Report · Changes · Task · Added by Siang Meng 11.Sep.2015
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  • Preview Singaporeans aren’t happy about having so many foreigners in their midst. · Preview
    -some Singaporeans resent the foreign talent policy as they feel that the foreign talents are competing with them over jobs -Many Singaporeans, especially parents, are worried that after their chil...
    References (0) · Comments (0) · Report · Changes · Task · Added by Siang Meng 10.Sep.2015
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  • Preview Cyclical Unemployment · Preview
    since Singapore is a small and open economy, heavily dependent upon exports, when exports fall, Singapore's Aggregate Demand will fall
    References (0) · Comments (0) · Report · Changes · Task · Added by Siang Meng 10.Sep.2015
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Add new negative effect of situation

Why is it a problem? (These could be formulated as sub problems).

  • Are people suffering or dying as a result of the problem?
  • Are great potential for improvements hindered because of the problem?
  • Is the problem an obstacle towards achieving another big important goal?
  • Is it an unanswered question that may result in large innovations or other great benefits if answered?

The negative aspect should be framed objectively from the view-point of the public/society.

Try to describe all the negative impacts in detail. Add one content item for each theme of impact/effect.

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Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

  • What are the different positive aspects of the problem?
  • Find positive aspects/effects by viewing the problem from different perspectives such as by group, sector, discipline, domain etc.

Watch out for

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

In this section you can add positive aspects of the situation. What are the positive things that the current system is supporting?

The positive aspects can be seen as the arguments for keeping the status quo.

Even though most people view the situation as a problem, there are probably also positive effects of the situation. To get a full perspective we must consider both the positive and the negative sides.

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What are the positive aspects of the situation?

  • Preview Under the Rent and Utilities Assistance Scheme · Preview
    -It is intended to assist families residing in 1 to 3-room Housing Development Board rental flats who are in arrears of rent, utilities charges and service & conservancy charges to meet such paymen...
    References (0) · Comments (0) · Report · Changes · Task · Added by Siang Meng 10.Sep.2015
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  • Preview Medifund · Preview
    -help needy Singaporeans pay their medical bills. -It provides the safety net for those who are so poor that they cannot even afford the charges at public hospitals and specialist out-patient clini...
    References (0) · Comments (0) · Report · Changes · Task · Added by Siang Meng 10.Sep.2015
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Add new positive effect of situation

What are the positive things about the situation?

  • The positive aspect should be framed objectively from the view-point of the general public.
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##Heading##
###Heading2###
**Bold**
_italic_
1. First list item
2. Next list item
* bullet item 1
* bullet item 2
[link text](http://url.com/ "tooltip")

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help

Add reference


Author(s)
Title
Publisher/journal
Date/year
Url address
Page number
For online sources that does not have page numbers. Use a paragraph number, or cite the heading and the number of paragraphs following it.

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Add Task


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Show version log

Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

Decide on the scope based on the resources you think you can gather or already have at your disposal.

  • What is the problem area we want to focus on?
  • Where do we draw the line of inquiry?
  • Is the scope narrow enough so we can successfully deal with it?
  • Is it Ok with a bigger scope? Bigger scope = more time and resources.
Useful tips:
  • Different ways to draw the boundary of inquiry:
    • Set a deadline
    • Choose a geographical border (local community, city, state, regional or global)
    • Choose to target a part of the population, a sub system, a domain.
    • Choose a level/threshold. For example if your challenge is World Poverty you may decide to focus on all kinds of poverty (including relative poverty) or narrow it down to extreme poverty.
  • It might be a good idea to ask stakeholders where they would draw the line and what other stakeholders they think should be included or left out.
  • Select a scope/boundary, iterate through the problem and reflect on the associated meanings entailed by the boundary frame. Each boundary has different values, actions, and possible effects.

You might disagree with the scope that has the majority vote. Your position may be that you should go more wide or narrow in your inquiry and problem solving. In this case you can always try to being

Watch out for

Try to suggest a proper boundary/scope.

  • The scope should be sufficiently open to include the essential cause–effect relations that a single causality approach would exclude. A wider scope will enable you to incorporate the views of more people. Keep in mind that a wider scope means more time and resources. It also means more complexity which will lead to more challenging problem solving.
  • The scope should be sufficiently narrow to avoid generalisation and a loss of focus.

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

The scope defines the boundary of this challenge. It helps us to decide how ambitious we want to be. Higher ambitions mean more time and resources.

By defining the scope it also becomes easier for others to create other challenges that do not overlap with this.

By defining a scope we are able to limit the work into something that can be solved. This is important because you can't expect to analyse everything about the problem.

We can never understand everything about the world and we cannot solve all the world's problems at once.

We have to be realistic. It is going to take a lot of effort to solve a complex problem. This section helps to narrow down the challenge into a manageable project.

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What is the scope and boundry of this challenge?

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American Unemployment: the Scope of the Problem

The unemployment rate in the country is expected to keep falling as 2012 progresses. Reuters

The full story of who works in America isn't told through the unemployment rate alone.

Hovering around 9 percent for the last few months, the statistic is the most commonly cited figure when politicians and journalists need to quantify the country's halting progress out of a recession. But economists are quick to acknowledge that it is only an indicator, and an imperfect one when it comes to conveying the full extent of the challenges encumbering the labor market.

The announced unemployment rate for September was 9.1 percent, a number that reflects the aggregate of responses from about 60,000 surveyed households. But the method for determining that number elides several factors that illustrate the breadth of labor market problems.

For one thing, the 9.1 percent statistic makes no distinction between full-time and part-time workers - for the purposes of measuring employment, a high school student with an after school job is equivalent to a lawyer or a CEO. That means the unemployment rate fails to capture the volume of American workers who are underemployed, relying on wages that aren't sufficient to support a family.

The unemployment rate also excludes people who have given up looking for work. The Bureau of Labor Statistics separates the active unemployed - those who are demonstrably seeking employment by sending out resumes and responding to job announcements - from the passive, who by virtue of not looking for work aren't considered to be part of the labor force.

The idea is they're not doing anything that could actually lead to them getting a job, said Tom Nardone, an assistant commissioner for current employment analysis with the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The underlying concept is that it has to be activity based.

That's not to say that everyone designated as not in the labor force doesn't want to work. In many cases, it would be more accurate to say that they've given up in the face of grinding long-term unemployment. That's reflected in the subset of people who are marginally attached to the labor force-- they want a job, are available to work and haven't been employed in the last 12 months. Within that category is what the Bureau of Labor Statistics labels discouraged workers who believe that they lack the proper qualifications or face some sort of discrimination (a provision in President Barack Obama's jobs bill that would prohibit employers from discriminating against people based on employment status speaks to the latter).

A separate measure commonly referred to as U-6 encompasses the nuances absent from the 9.1 percent figure - in addition to the unemployed, it considers people marginally attached to the labor force and people who want full time work but are forced to accept part-time jobs. In September, the U-6 rate stood at 16.5 percent, more than seven points higher than the conventional unemployment rate.

The percentage of long-term unemployed is not a number you can fit into a traditional unemployment statistic, said Andrew Reamer, a research professor at George Washington University and chairman of the Bureau of Labor Statistics Data Users Advisory Group. You have to look at several numbers to get a full picture of the current state of the labor market and the current situation of the labor force.

In September, 6.24 million of the people officially considered unemployed had been without work for six months or more. Obama's attempt to shield the long-term unemployed from discrimination speaks to the fact that these workers face a self-perpetuating problem - the longer they are out of work, the more their skills erode and the greater challenge they face in winning over wary employers.

Add to that the number of people not even measured by the unemployment rate, and a picture emerges of an economy unlikely to fully recover any time soon. Even if the economy were to strengthen and start adding a substantial number of jobs, the unemployment rate could rise as workers considered out of the labor force, encouraged by a sunnier outlook, flow back into the labor market.

How many people are long-term unemployed is a big problem and unlikely to change, said Tom Larson, a professor of economics and statistics at California State University, Los Angeles. With the severity and length of the recession, people with long term unemployment are going to have quite a bit of trouble re-entering.

Unemployment figures get even trickier when broken down by industry. Magnifying the unemployment picture has advantages, but some workers dissolve into the background.

The Bureau of Labor Statistic's dissection of unemployment by sector is particularly useful for showing the ebb and flow of the American economy, and despite the 9.1 percent figure, some industries, like mining, are growing robustly. As a whole, around 5,500 mining jobs were added in the past year.

But, the official unemployment by industry statistics are just as opaque as the overall statistics.

As a general point if you don't have a job - you can't always be assigned to an industry, said Stephen Bronars, Senior Economist for Welch Consulting. For job losers it's the industry of their last job. Many unemployed workers today are just out of school, or trying to get a job for the first time in a while (after taking care of children or a family member).

For these jobless workers, there is no 'industry' assigned. Still others have been jobless for a long time, so even though the B.L.S. assigns them to an industry, it means less for someone who last worked two years ago.

The mining industry is an exemplar of this. According to the B.L.S., the unemployment rate in the supersector fell from 8.2 percent to 6.2 percent between September 2010 and September 2011. Mining engineering schools are struggling to keep up with a growing demand for skilled workers, and starting engineers can make up to $90,000 per year domestically, and more in places like Australia and Canada.

Yet, miners are quick to point out that industry is hardly exempt from the recession. Job creation and job loss varies between each different mining sector. While the metals and materials industry is growing, thanks to a boost in the commodities market, tens of thousands of workers are unemployed in the aggregates sector, which is responsible for the sand and gravel used for construction projects.

The aggregates industry has lost about 30 percent of its workforce because of the lack of federal commitment to invest in infrastructure, said John S. Hayden, Director of Public Affairs and Government Relations for the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration. Big aggregates have downsized quite a bit. There are lots of employees on sidelines waiting for the industry to pick-up.

That means that despite the 5,500 new mining jobs added between September 2010 and 2011, there are still at about 30,000 unemployed workers in an area that's only getting weaker.

There's no way construction is going to rebound anytime soon, Hayden added. Even if there were new government projects, it would be a long time until those companies got back above 2008 levels.

Payroll figures can also, in theory, show the future of the American economic landscape. While some industries grow, others are shrinking, potentially approaching zero. The types of jobs being created and being lost also provide a valuable projection of the types of jobs that will be available in the future.

The blue collar worker has borne the brunt of this recession, said Art Papas, CEO and Co-Founder of recruiting software company Bullhorn. I.T. jobs are in high demand, but, manufacturing, industrial, construction are really lagging.

People who lost their jobs are also faring worse than in any recession of the last three decades, according to a paper by Princeton economist Henry F. Farber. He found that the rate of people finding new work was under 50 percent, substantially lower than in previous downturns, and found that a higher proportion of those who did find work were forced to accept part-time positions. People who returned to work also faced curtailed wages, earning on average 17.5 percent less than in their previous jobs.

It is clear that the dynamics of unemployment in the Great Recession are fundamentally different from unemployment dynamics in earlier recessions, Farber wrote, adding that durations of unemployment are unprecedentedly long.

On a national level, there are available jobs that simply can't be filled in the current economy. The housing collapse has trapped many people in cities without work, and the death of manufacturing combined with the rise in technology has shifted the employment focus from one skill set to another.

It sounds odd, but in Texas there's a hiring boom, but companies are having trouble hiring because people can't move to Texas, said Papas. People in Michigan can't get out of their mortgages to go to Texas.

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Add new scope

What is to be included or excluded from the analysis of the problem?

With a larger scope you may have too much work and things will become to complex to get anywhere. With a too narrow focus you may not solve the root causes and you may just be creating short term solutions that never solves the real problem at all.


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Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

Formulate the question such as "How might we..." or "In what ways might we..."

The focusing question should be one single question. At this stage you should aim to create a single coherent and simple focusing question. Breaking it down in several "research" questions are meant for later stages of the process.

In formulating this question you may ask yourself

  • What is our ultimate goal? (To formulate an ideal goal you may try to think of what the world would be like if the problem was nonexistent.)
  • What do we really want? Get the bigger picture, think holistically and synergistically.
  • Review the needs and wants of stakeholders if needed.

Watch out for

  • Do not use this section for your teams research questions. Instead formulate it from the perspective of the public.
  • Make sure not to limit the question by including unnecessary constraints.
  • Do not include solutions in the focusing question.

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

The focusing question can be seen as the purpose of this challenge space. It describes what it is that we would like to see changed regarding the social problem at hand.

To formulate a focusing question you may try to take the problem statement and turn it into a question.

The focusing question helps us to communicate the ultimate goal.

The focusing question helps us decide what to focus on (when researching the social challenge).

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What would be a good focusing question?

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How can the Singapore government maintain the low unemployment rate of 2015?

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Add new focusing question

The focusing question is written as a question. For example: How can we reduce / increase / remove ...


Max allowed length: 300
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Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

  • Choose your medium
    • Draw an illustration on paper, or
    • Use drawing software, or
    • Create a collage by puting together several images that you will scan or take a digital photo of.
  • The rich picture should contain the main topics and the main people, organizations and activities/programmes. Identify stakeholders, insitutions, organizations, groups, artifacts, conditions, physical resources, phenomena, stocks (things that are accumulated and can increase or decrease)
  • Use nodes to represent the key concepts you found above. Label each element in the drawing using nouns.
  • Nodes may contain other nodes (to indicate break-out of a document or an organizational/product/process structure.
  • Use arrows to depict linkages, relationships or flow between nodes. What is being tranferred, exchanged etc. Add a label on the arrow.
  • Depict structure, e.g. organisation boundaries, geographical considerations, people and institutions. For example using dashed lines or circles.
  • Depict processes - activities, information or material flows.
  • Depict the climate - what are people feeling and thinking? Are people outraged or is there a sense of apathy?
  • Depict human concerns, conflicts, views.
  • Depict the environment such as external interested parties and various factors affecting the situation.
Other tips
  • For clarity, avoid crossover of arrows.
  • To maintain reasonable size for presentation purposes, the ratio of nodes to links should be approximately 1.5.
  • Main flow of reading is from top left to bottom right.
  • Color may be used to draw attention to subfamilies of concepts and transformations.
Examples of icons to use
  • Procedure (as a script roll)
  • Organization (as a building)
  • Person (as match stick man)
  • Mechanical system (as two gears)
  • Conflict (as two crossed swords)
Example Rich pictures

Watch out for

  • Don't make the picture too complicated or it will fail to work as a communication tool. Include what is most important.

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

This section should give a visual summary to the problem.

Rich pictures are used to provide a model for thinking about the system and to help gain an appreciation of the problem situation.

It also works as a useful artifact for discussing the problem in groups such as with different stakeholders.

Suggested reading

Provide a visual summary. Why is it such a big problem and what are the issues?

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Unemployment is a term used to describe the state of a person who is not involved in paid work. This could be due to a number of reasons - illness,disability, lack of qualifications of the economic climate of their country.

Currently, the rates of unemployment in countries such as America andGreat Britain are very high. This is because employers generally have less money to spend on workers, so may refuse to hire extra staff, or may make others redundant. This can lead to a downwards spiral known as the cycle of unemployment. The cycle of unemployment states that, if employers have little money to pay staff, they may make a number of staff unemployed. This means that the now-unemployed staff have little money in their pocket to spend. As a result, demand for goods drops, meaning businesses make less profit. If businesses make less profit, they have less money to pay staff... And so the cycle continues.

One theory of reducing unemployment is to break this cycle. There are a number of ways to try to break it. One way is to encourage the people of the country to spend more money, in order to keep demand for goods up, and therefore keep companies and producers in action. Another way is to provide government funding to companies which are in danger of "going under" or becoming "bankrupt". If government funding is provided for suchbusinesses, they are less likely to fire their staff. However, if companies accept government funding

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Add new in a nutshell

Provide a summary text and image. Make it memorable. This section is intended for communicating the problem to others. Try to give an overview of the most important issues.


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Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

  • What is the paradox or absurdity?
  • You might for example use the following statement: 'Despite ... we are still ...?'

Watch out for

Don't get too specific.

This text is only intended to show that the problem is "complicated".

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

All complex problems have paradoxes.

This sub section brings attention to things that confound us about the problem.

This text is intended to show that the problem is complicated and not easy to solve.

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What are some of the paradoxes?

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More than five years have now passed since the Lehman shock of September 2008 and its employment consequences are now more visible than ever. At the end of last year, close to 50 million people were unemployed in OECD member countries, about 16 million more than before the crisis broke out. Furthermore, the unemployment rate had been broadly stable for more than two years and improvement is expected to be very gradual.

If there is something to be surprised about in this situation, it is that it is not worse. After all output growth in the advanced countries became extremely weak since 2008 – less than 1 percent per year on average – and employment could have been expected to decline much more.

The employment toll has actually been very large in the U.S., where the employment recession has been of exceptional magnitude, with total employment still about 1 percent below the pre-crisis peak and where the share of adults with a job (what economists call the employment rate) has remained around 58-59 percent since 2009, against 63 percent in 2007. In spite of all U.S. policymakers' fiscal and monetary stimulus efforts, and in spite of the relatively strong U.S. recovery, new jobs added each month only make up for the increase in the working-age population. Put differently, the U.S. along has lost more than 10 million jobs in the crisis.

But the situation is much better in Europe. This may seem unlikely in view of all the suffering Europe is undergoing. True, unemployment has deteriorated more (for the EU, four percentage points between 2007 and 2013) than in the U.S. (a little more than two percentage points). True, Greece and Spain stand out as particularly hard-hit. In these countries, the unemployment rate exceeds 25 percent and the employment rate has not dropped by 5 percentage points as in the U.S., but by 10 percentage points. But this dismal record should not hide that the employment rate has actually increased in Germany, that it has barely changed in France and that even in Italy, where GDP per capita is back to the 1997 level, its increase has remained moderate.

This observation is paradoxical for two reasons. First, how is it that Europe does worse on unemployment but better on employment? Second, how can it do better whereas growth has been much worse than in the U.S.?

The explanation for the first paradox is that European countries have actually seen a major rise in labor force participation. As documented in detail by the OECD, in recent years a larger proportion of working-age people have been employed or are looking for a job. This has been the case for older workers, and also for women. This was largely due to reforms enacted in the 2000s to foster labor force participation and the postponement of the retirement age. Evolutions in the crisis are testimony that these reforms have delivered. Only the younger generations have moved in the other direction and reduced their participation in the labor market in particularly inauspicious times. But contrary to fears most of them have actually chosen to stay in education or go into some sort of pre-employment training. Only a fraction has been NEET (Neither in Employment nor in Education or Training, as goes the jargon).

So overall more people have entered the European labor markets or remained part of it, contrary to the U.S. where withdrawal from the labor force has been more widespread. This explains why Europe has at the same time recorded a smaller decrease in employment and a larger increase in unemployment.

Turning to the second paradox, the puzzle is why the European employment recession has been much milder than the U.S. one where as its economic recession has been much worse. The short and almost tautological answer is that for the last five years, productivity growth has been consistently lower. In the euro area for example, productivity grown over the 2008-2012 period has been barely positive, whereas it has been close to 1.5 percent per year in the U.S.

Initially this difference could be regarded as of a short-term nature. When confronted with a major shock back in 2008, U.S. firms responded by laying off workers aggressively to cut costs and preserve profits. Their European counterparts tried much more to preserve jobs and retain skills – at the expense of profits. They were often encouraged to do so by government-sponsored partial unemployment schemes (what the Germans call Kurzarbeit, literally "short work"). But their behavior was almost dictated by self-interest: compared to their U.S. counterparts, firms in Europe often rely much more on their workers' specific, on-the-job acquired skills and they were keen on not losing them.

But as time passed this explanation became less and less relevant. The reason for the very low productivity growth in Europe looks more and more of a deeper nature: The crisis has made European firms less able to invest and innovate, and this is having an impact on overall productivity. Potential growth in Europe has certainly slowed down, nobody knows for sure by how much but certainly by more than anticipated.

This evidence sheds some light on the policy debates on both sides of the Atlantic. For the U.S., a key issue is how to avoid the employment loss it has experienced to become entrenched. The more people that are out of work or out of the labor force, the more difficult it is for them to re-enter it. This is a major concern behind the U.S. policy community's continued insistence on stimulating demand. The fact that they have not succeeded at least in moving in the right direction is a cause for worry.

For Europe, unemployment must for sure be a continued concern but a lack of productivity growth has emerged as an issue to be tackled in priority. There is also the risk that slow growth can become entrenched – and have major consequences on incomes, welfare costs and the sustainability of the social model. The problem is that policymakers do not know exactly how to stimulate it. Education, innovation and competition are obvious recipes but will they suffice?

 

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Add new paradox

All complex problems have paradoxes.

  • What is the paradox?
  • Use the template: 'Despite ... we are still ...?'

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Suggested tasks/questions for this sub section

Gather terms, keywords and phrases that are often used when talking about this problem.

Add a content item for each word that people may not completely understand or agree to the meaning of.

Watch out for

Advanced topics

Further reading for intermediate problem solvers:

Definition of terms is a mini dictionary. It is here to make sure everyone knows what exactly the different concepts mean.

This section can be seen as a vocabulary for the problem. As with most things in the world, many things have many names and different meanings in different contexts to different people.

This definition of terms helps to clarify what this problem solving team mean with words that otherwise could be ambiguous and cause communication problems.

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What are some important definition of terms for this problem?

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DEFINITION of 'Unemployment'

Unemployment occurs when a person who is actively searching for employment is unable to find work. Unemployment is often used as a measure of the health of the economy. The most frequently cited measure of unemployment is the unemployment rate. This is the number of unemployed persons divided by the number of people in the labor force.



 

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Add new term

Add a definition of some term.

  • Make is short en consice definition.
  • Add a reference to Wikipedia or some other source.

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Issue type



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Issue title


Description
Development issues